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Thread: Dutch rolls

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Spokane Wa.
    Posts
    1,461

    Default Dutch rolls

    I thought that was Danish! I took my biannual from and old timer instructor the other day and the first thing he wanted me to do was Dutch rolls. I never even heard of a Dutch roll untill then. I made him show me what he wanted first, and then I tried it. What a mess out of that!! After about 3-4 tries, it turnes out to be fun, and makes ya feel like a new kid pilot again. I wonder why this was so new to me, with 1400 hours behind me and this was the first guy that ever asked me to do it? Makes me want to fly with a differant instructor once a week untill I pick up on all these things that I have missed in the past.
    At any rate, he sure was impressed with my tripacers performance and handling. I think he asked me 3 times what engine was in it. Then for a power on stall that just would'nt stall. Held it there long enough that I finally just let it go over a wee bit and made the recovery with out any loss of altitude to speak of and he is just shaking his head!! I looked at the airspeed and it was well below the 40 mark when I let it quit. I wish I would've looked at the rate of climb, but I did'nt. Would'nt surprise me a bit if it was still climbing!
    He has been giving instructiions in a PA15-17 with a 65 in it and I think he figured they would fly a little more alike than it did.
    At any rate, I sure am happy with the way this thing turned out. It is like a brand new airplane! OH, and a kid pilot!!
    Tom T.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    215

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    Tom

    I was (un?)fortunate to have not less than 6 instructors during my tenure as student. Secondary to a history of having one of those danged blasted ( pun intended ) kidney stones, I had a difficult time procuring my medical , so the student -with - instructor - in - the - cockpit flying was stretched out over an extended period of time. Each and every one seemed to have their favorite pet-peeves and favorite maneuvers to practice. One of those fav maneuvers was turns-about-a-point. Seems he liked to have me practice that over a local state park that had a large lake ---- that just happened to have a beach, and the girl's bath house just happened to be one of those cost-cutting varietes that was without a roof. Needless to say we got a lot of waves from the ground.
    One of the instructors liked Chandelles. I didn't like Chandelles because they made me sick -- and he was afraid he was going to clean it up. So , naturally we didn't do many of those. I think it was a total of 2. One liked spins, another stalled seemingly all the danged time.
    Anyway, have fun Bro' ! After what you been through during your rebuild, you deserve it.

    Johnnie

  3. #3
    hondacubber Guest

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    Tom,

    The owner of the Pacer I have been flying just got his private and did not really know how to do slips to loose altitude for landing. We have had fun with that when ever we were higher than the flaps would bring us down. Are you coming to Prosser for the fly-in next weekend?

    Eric in Yakima

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Spokane Wa.
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    I did'nt know of the fly in next week, but I dont see why I could'nt go. Never been in that part of the desert before, haha. I heard there was a couple of tricks in order to get in there.
    When I was working at Hanford, I lived in Prosser and commuted. I should say I lived at that big red barn, [lounge] more than the apartment.
    Tom T.

  5. #5
    metrallarider Guest

    Default

    My very first day, my instructor had me do Dutch Rolls. Once you get the hang of them, they do help your coordination. I prefer Cinnamon though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by metrallarider
    My very first day, my instructor had me do Dutch Rolls. Once you get the hang of them, they do help your coordination. I prefer Cinnamon though.
    Dangit Jim you stole my joke...

    Don't feel too bad Tom, I had been flying for 9 or 10 years when a BFR guy asked me for a dutch roll, I said "I don't know if they have Dutch but theres a Sizzler down there, want me to put her on the highway?"
    "Some people are like a Slinky, absolutely useless but you cant help but smile when you push them down the stairs."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    215

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    Tom

    Did my BFR the other day with a well respected CFI /CFII / FAA examiner , who has been flying for over almost 50 years. Danged good teacher she is. --kinda like flying with your Dear Old Mom --(She's the one recommended by most pilots when their timid little wives want to learn a "pinch-hitter" type of course). Anyway, took off, lightly loaded what with me about 225 lbs and she about 125 lbs, proceeded over to the practice area and started to do power-on stalls. Slowed the ship way down, popped out full flap, raised the nose and applied full power. Ball centered. Kept climbing. Raised the nose some more. Kept climbing. Ball centered. Raised it more. The entire windscreen was filled with nothing but the sight of sky and clouds overhead. Well, that first try I became uncomfortable and gave up. It was really bumpy , what with the afternoon cumulus building overhead, and I was working hard enough to maintain altitude +/- 50 feet, and wings level. Rather than yelling at me or otherwise blasting me for losing my nerve, we talked about it briefly and tried it again. "I'm telling ya' John, these little planes are Angels. Just keep the ball centered and we will be just fine--RELAX " Finally , flaps out and the nose way ( I mean WAY up there,and flying into a 15kt wind and seemingly hovering over the ground , she tapped the VSI with her index finger and said , " There it is. See the negative descent rate? We are now stalled. I love teaching in these great little airplanes. They're so stable. Now, recover". I also re-discovered the fun of turns about a point, "S" turns across a road , and the fun of ( yes the fun of ) simulated engine-outs. For some reason, I like that challenge. Hope I never have to do it for real, though. That seems to be happening a lot around here, lately, and it ain't helping my cause in trying to alleviate the Lil' RedHead's fear of flying......

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Spokane Wa.
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigJohnnie View Post
    Tom

    Did my BFR the other day with a well respected CFI /CFII / FAA examiner , who has been flying for over almost 50 years. Danged good teacher she is. --kinda like flying with your Dear Old Mom --(She's the one recommended by most pilots when their timid little wives want to learn a "pinch-hitter" type of course). Anyway, took off, lightly loaded what with me about 225 lbs and she about 125 lbs, proceeded over to the practice area and started to do power-on stalls. Slowed the ship way down, popped out full flap, raised the nose and applied full power. Ball centered. Kept climbing. Raised the nose some more. Kept climbing. Ball centered. Raised it more. The entire windscreen was filled with nothing but the sight of sky and clouds overhead. Well, that first try I became uncomfortable and gave up. It was really bumpy , what with the afternoon cumulus building overhead, and I was working hard enough to maintain altitude +/- 50 feet, and wings level. Rather than yelling at me or otherwise blasting me for losing my nerve, we talked about it briefly and tried it again. "I'm telling ya' John, these little planes are Angels. Just keep the ball centered and we will be just fine--RELAX " Finally , flaps out and the nose way ( I mean WAY up there,and flying into a 15kt wind and seemingly hovering over the ground , she tapped the VSI with her index finger and said , " There it is. See the negative descent rate? We are now stalled. I love teaching in these great little airplanes. They're so stable. Now, recover". I also re-discovered the fun of turns about a point, "S" turns across a road , and the fun of ( yes the fun of ) simulated engine-outs. For some reason, I like that challenge. Hope I never have to do it for real, though. That seems to be happening a lot around here, lately, and it ain't helping my cause in trying to alleviate the Lil' RedHead's fear of flying......
    Is'nt it funny how a guy just gets used to flying the strait and narrow and forgets how much fun it is to put them thru their paces once in a while?Acting like a kid so to say, huh?
    During my instrument training [in a tripacer] my instructor[ex fighter pilot] could see me over there sweeting and all nervious so he yelled out, MY PLANE and imediately put it in a steep dive and pulled it up into a loop and then rolled out yelling uuuu like a machine gun and dove into a flock of sea gulls hollering how he just got us some me109s. Then it was; there, ya see, it aint gunna fall apart and now go ahead and fly the dam thing!! Funny how ya remember things like that 48 years later.
    Tom T.

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