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Thread: Takeoff on right or left wing?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Newnan
    Posts
    9

    Default Takeoff on right or left wing?

    I just bought a 1952 Tri-Pacer and have a question.
    I've heard that I should use the right tank when taking off because most turns after takeoff are left, which could cause the fuel to flow away from the engine if I use the left tank on takeoff. Is this correct? I don't see any mention of it in the POH.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mason, Ohio
    Posts
    341

    Default

    Russ

    You should familiarize yourself with the Aircraft Specification or the TCDS (Type Certificate Data Sheet). You can find them in the Maintenance Data Depot on the Club's web site or on the FAA web site. I think your airplane fits under Item II. You then need to look at the items pertinent to all models and specifically look at Note 2K which states you should have a placard on your panel that says (k) On right fuel quantity gauge (Serial Nos. 22-1 to 22-7642) "No take-off on right tank with less than 1/3 tank." Also, AD 67-24-07 requires a placard that states "Right Tank Level Flight Only With Less Than 1/3 Tank." The reason for this is not so much the unporting of the tank which in theory I guess could happen, but more because the routing of the fuel lines which can cause the engine to be high relative to the low point of the fuel line and thus limit the fuel flow. This can occur when the right tank is feeding off the aft port at high angles of attack and less than 1/3 of a tank of fuel. The fuel line from the aft port of the right fuel tank runs down the door pillar to the gascolator on the right floor and under the floor up to the fuel selector valve. This routing can cause limited fuel flow at high angles of attack.

    Tom Anderson
    Last edited by Tom Anderson; 02-04-2018 at 01:23 AM. Reason: Added note on AD

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Lebanon, Mo.
    Posts
    187

    Default

    Like Tom said at high angles of attack for a long duration could cause fuel starvation, but in turns it will not affect the fuel flow unless the airplane is flown in uncoordinated flight.

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